HOUSE PORN: Pioneering Female Architect Ann Rysdale.

This weekend, Tucson's modern architecture is being celebrated with a three-day series of tours and events.  Architect Anne Rysdale, 92 is being acknowledged as the prolific architect of Tucson's postwar boom from the late 1940s to 1980.

She worked in the heyday of midcentury modern architecture, designing more than 400 projects in the Tucson area from modern ranch-style homes to commercial structures like the The Shelter cocktail lounge, the Tucson Inn, the Spanish Trail Motor Hotel, and the Sun Building—even a few McDonald’s. She changed the face of Tucson architecture—dotting it with a modernism not seen in the otherwise Spanish Colonial Revival design more accepted in the town.

"I was a midcentury architect," she told the Tucson Weekly. "If they gave me a job, I'd do it—shopping centers, public buildings. I did the courthouse in Globe from scratch. I remodeled the Tucson City Hall. I did lots of schools in Tucson."

In 1949, Rysdale, became a registered architect in the state of Arizona. From 1949 to the 1960s, Rysdale was the only registered female architect practicing in Arizona.

"I opened offices in Tucson, Tempe, Globe and Albuquerque," Rysdale says. "At the top of employment, I had 106 employees. More than half my work was in Tucson, but I did commercial work in New Mexico and Texas, and sororities in California."

As a woman in business, "I put up with the usual crap and garbage—everything that women professionals run into."

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