Salon.com on the block: "I think we'd all like to think you don't have to be a media conglomerate to succeed at doing high-quality journalism..."

The news media world continues to be influx.

As our lives move to a mix of digital and real-world experiences, consumption of media has migrated to this same dynamic. We consume information online, and offline.

Instead of just reading the morning paper, or reading a print magazine in a doctor's office, consumers have been given CHOICE and PORTABILITY through online media. And they're gobbling it up.

However, revenue models for successful digital ventures have been hard to come by. Most media companies have struggled with how to make money in a strictly digital world. Only a few seem to be achieving financial success. Most find it is a combination of print and online revenue--via advertising and subscriptions, as the key to financial success.

Take The Daily Beast and Newsweek, who decided to merge earlier this month. A strictly digital model (The Daily Beast) or a mostly print model (Newsweek) was not delivering the necessary profit to support a mainstream media business.

And now comes word that Salon.com is offering itself for sale.

Salon was a pioneer in digital media. It has been around for 15 years, but recently has accumulated enough debt that its owners see no other choice than to merge of sell to another media company--one who presumably could make it a money-making venture.

"I think we'd all like to think you don't have to be a media conglomerate to succeed at doing high-quality journalism," Richard Gingras, Salon's chief executive said. "Right now, the content economy we have today says you probably have to be."


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